Erogito

Restoration and Neoclassical Miscellanea

John Donne & the ‘Amorous Lady’ of Barbados

While John Donne and the ‘Amorous Lady’ of the Barbados Gazette lived a hundred years apart, their poetry has much in common . . . a ” peculiar fusion of intellect … Continue reading

October 10, 2017 · Leave a comment

The ‘Anonymous Lady’

A series of poems by the ‘Anonymous’ or ‘Amorous’ lady were published in “The Barbados Gazette” between 1732 and 1738. Her identity is never revealed by the newspaper’s editor, however, … Continue reading

October 9, 2017 · Leave a comment

Getting Dressed in the 18th Century

It took so long to get dressed in the 18th century that it’s a miracle any of these people ever left the house. See for yourself in this fascinating and … Continue reading

October 9, 2017 · Leave a comment

Eat Thine Pantaloons: Satire Then & Now

Posted by Gabrielle Zitka Satire is an art of walking a thin line between ridicule, humor, irony, and social commentary. It can take the form of literature, songs, television shows, … Continue reading

December 8, 2015 · Leave a comment

Literary Critics Then and Now

Posted by: Jazmin Williams Major Literary Critics from the Restoration/Neoclassical Era Major Literary Critics of the 20th-Century            

December 8, 2015 · Leave a comment

Johnson: The Rambling Teacher

Posted by: Ioan Stoica Samuel Johnson published the first article of The Rambler in March, 1750; by March 1752, when he had done, he had published 208 articles. The Rambler … Continue reading

December 8, 2015 · Leave a comment

Feminism: Let’s Take It Back to the Start

Posted by: Emily Robinson It seems Feminism today has taken on a different meaning than it did from the start. When Feminism was first established, the movement was presented as … Continue reading

December 8, 2015 · Leave a comment

Pirate Newton: Theft of Color

Posted by: Laura Redman Sir Isaac Newton was a man of many talents.  From astronomy, science, and physics, he developed multiple theories and laws— the Theory of Color, Laws of Gravity, … Continue reading

December 8, 2015 · Leave a comment

A Diss Through Time

Posted by: Jessica Norman John Dryden wrote Mac Flecknoe to be a satire on Thomas Shadwell as a writer and poet.   This was a direct response to Shadwell’s satire The … Continue reading

December 8, 2015 · Leave a comment

Slave Narratives: Does It Matter Who Tells the Story?

Have you ever told someone a story about something that happened in your life? Maybe it was the story of how you broke your arm when you fell out of … Continue reading

December 7, 2015 · Leave a comment

The Book of English

Posted by Diana Esquivel Think of a moment when you have experienced acute memory loss while spelling a word, or a time you weren’t sure of the correct definition of … Continue reading

December 7, 2015 · Leave a comment

Ever Changing English

Posted by: Kathryn Concepcion “Total and sudden transformations of a language seldom happen.”  These words were written by Samuel Johnson, father of the English dictionary, in the Preface to A … Continue reading

December 7, 2015 · Leave a comment

Mom! Swift’s Picking On Me!

Posted by: Riley Clark Unlike the common belief that Jonathan Swift was a lady-hater while he was alive, he was in fact the ladies’ man. Swift had one woman drooling … Continue reading

December 7, 2015 · Leave a comment

All Lives Matter

Posted by Gina Foster For unknown reasons, our educational system in the United States fans the flame of racism in our country.  It skews the issue of slavery by presenting … Continue reading

December 1, 2015 · Leave a comment

A Pilgrim’s Persecution?

Posted by: Dasheek Dennis As history is revealed and the future unfolds, religious controversy is nothing new and nothing old. The friction caused by religion tends to spark a roaring … Continue reading

December 1, 2015 · Leave a comment

“A Modest Proposal”: An Old Solution to a Modern Problem

Posted by: Elizabeth Vance Jonathan Swift’s essay has long been regarded as a satirical disquisition that parodies Swift as a humanitarian attempting to alleviate Ireland of its burdensome, impoverished citizens. … Continue reading

November 30, 2015 · Leave a comment

If it Ain’t Baroque, Don’t Fix it: Satire and Breaking Norms in The Beggar’s Opera

Posted by: Shawn Flickner The Beggar’s Opera, written by John Gay, first premiered on January 29th, 1728.  It was “the first recorded long running play, which managed 62 successive performances … Continue reading

November 30, 2015 · Leave a comment

The Irony of Daniel Defoe’s Argument’s Success vs. Mary Astell’s

Posted by: Patricia Niculas Both Daniel Defoe’s Roxana and Mary Astell’s Some Reflections Upon Marriage dissect the idea of marriage and propose their objections from a woman’s perspective. While both … Continue reading

November 29, 2015 · Leave a comment

The Amorous Lady: A Critique on the Past and Current Conceptions of Art

Posted by: Katelyn Lindsey The definition of art has always been something widely discussed within different groups; what’s even more controversial is the idea on how one should do ‘proper … Continue reading

November 29, 2015 · Leave a comment

Mirror, Mirror on the wall…How do I know what I know at all?

Posted by: Laura Walsh John Locke uprooted the famous theories of Renee Descartes, often referred to as the father of philosophy, with his groundbreaking epistemology that challenged innate knowledge and … Continue reading

November 7, 2015 · Leave a comment

Aphra Behn, Closet Abolitionist?

Posted by: Leah Avitabile “Love ceases to be a pleasure when it ceases to be a secret” – Aphra Behn Little is known of Behn besides her writing. Fortunately, her … Continue reading

November 5, 2015 · Leave a comment

Marriage Advice from Lady Roxana: A Modern Interpretation of Her Reasoning

Posted by:  Eleanor Reeves Marriage tends to be a popular topic of discussion these days among women. Whether a woman is married or single, it is on their mind; they’re … Continue reading

October 29, 2015 · Leave a comment

Lady’s Dressing Rooms Haven’t Changed All That Much Since 1732

Posted by: Amy Warner What does Jonathon Swift know about modern make-up struggles? The answer is nearly everything. In his poem, “The Lady’s Dressing Room”, written in 1732, he discusses … Continue reading

October 17, 2015 · Leave a comment

The Inspiration and Legend of Aphra Behn

You may have never heard of her, but the career of Aphra Behn was a turning point in the history of female authors. Although there were many female poets before … Continue reading

December 6, 2013 · Leave a comment

An Age of Criticism – Dryden and Pope: Raw Talent or Learned Skill

On Criticism and Genius Alexander Pope developed an appreciation for the art of criticism from an early age. It was his father who, “would assign verses to the little boy … Continue reading

September 28, 2013 · Leave a comment

Dryden and Pope: The Art of Writing

John Dryden and Alexander Pope came from different educational backgrounds and perspectives.  Dryden received a classical education and was a graduate of Trinity College. On the other hand, Pope did … Continue reading

September 28, 2013 · Leave a comment

The Educational Divide: Perspectives and Advice for the Modern Writer . . .

Courtesy of John Dryden and Alexander Pope John Dryden was formally educated, and like many people of means, may not have fully appreciated the advantages his education afforded him. Alexander … Continue reading

September 26, 2013 · Leave a comment

Aphra Behn: Spy, Prisoner, Writer . . . Pioneer of Feminism.

“… faith, Sir, we are here to Day, and gone to Morrow.” — Aphra Behn, The Lucky Chance Behn’s Literary Impact In her time, Aphra Behn was mysterious and unique. … Continue reading

September 16, 2013 · Leave a comment

Dryden and the Age of Satire

“Learn to write well, or not to write at all” Essay on Satire “Of all the tyrannies on human kind The worst is that which persecutes the mind” The Hind … Continue reading

August 27, 2013 · Leave a comment